Here’s a snippet of our interview with Bryan “Color Chemist” Collins. You can read the rest of the awesome Q&A tomorrow!
BPT: How would you describe your style of art?BC: When painting art toys I tend to make lots of monsters and work with sci-fi themes, as well as oceanic mythology. I hear it called “whimsical surrealism.” I think I like that.BPT: What inspires you to create? Where do you get your ideas from?BC: I am fascinated with animals, myths, legends, and nature in general. Believing that God made everything in the universe, I consider Him the original artist. Everything I make is therefore inspired by God.
*Above: Collins’ first custom Munny, a self-portrait.

Here’s a snippet of our interview with Bryan “Color Chemist” Collins. You can read the rest of the awesome Q&A tomorrow!

BPT: How would you describe your style of art?
BC: When painting art toys I tend to make lots of monsters and work with sci-fi themes, as well as oceanic mythology. I hear it called “whimsical surrealism.” I think I like that.

BPT: What inspires you to create? Where do you get your ideas from?
BC: I am fascinated with animals, myths, legends, and nature in general. Believing that God made everything in the universe, I consider Him the original artist. Everything I make is therefore inspired by God.

*Above: Collins’ first custom Munny, a self-portrait.

Turning Dolls into Zombies - Bobby Sauceda

For the first ever Bean Pot Toiz artist interview we sat down with San Antonio native, Bobby Sauceda, to talk about his unique hobby of turning plain baby dolls into horror themed creatures.

BPT: So Bobby, when did you first get into customizing dolls?
Sauceda: Probably mid ‘90s. There was this old cartoon called Super Friends that I loved watching as a kid. They never made the Legion of Doom, which are the super villains, so I decided to make my own action figures.

BPT: What kind of materials did you use for your customizing?
Sauceda: Well back then, I didn’t know much so I used Super Sculpey. It’s pretty good stuff, but eventually it will crack. I moved up to Magic Sculp, which works a lot better.

BPT: What’s the hardest part about creating your own doll?
Sauceda: Parting with them. After I making them they come out looking so cool, but I want other people to enjoy them. A lot of my friends own my dolls, so I know they’re in good homes.

BPT: Where do you get your ideas from? Do you have characters in mind?
Sauceda: I’m a huge fan of pop-culture, movies, and horror characters. Mainly I love creating themes, so I’ll do a run of zombie dolls or a run of clowns. I really like Spawn figures, they have so much detail in the sculpting, so I use a lot of their parts and incorporate them into my dolls.

BPT: What’s your next project?
Sauceda:  I want to do some insect-themed dolls and some Barbies since it’s such a classic icon. I just like the thought of trying to remove the beauty off of a Barbie. My girlfriend collects Barbies so we’re like polar opposites because I love destroying them.

BPT: How long does it usually take you to finish a piece from start to finish?
Sauceda:  I could really get into it in one day, it just really depends. Usually the painting takes the longest because I’m such a perfectionist. I spend a lot of my time on small details over and over again until I get it right.

BPT: What’s your favorite piece you’ve made, out of everything?
Sauceda: Probably one called “Pumpkin,” she’s a Halloween-themed doll. All I did was buy a little doll sweater with a pumpkin on the front, and I just thought of this whole story for it. Like, what if this little girl who loved jack-o-lanterns so much that she actually carved her face into a jack-o-lantern. I added some glow-in-the-dark details on her eyes and now the head kind of lights up like a jack-lantern.

BPT: Is this just a hobby or dream job?
Sauceda: Not a dream job because some of them are really frustrating. When you’re trying to make something that looks like an existing character or object it’s a lot harder to get it just right. There’s a lot more pressure.

BPT: Where do you see yourself in the future, making these same dolls or branching off into different things?
Sauceda: I like that I don’t use a set format of dolls, I can do action figures or baby dolls, whatever I want really, but I think for now I’ll stick to doll making.


Bobby “Freddy Krueger” Sauceda with BPT’s own Grego Hernandez during the 2010 San Diego Comic Con.